On August 13, Inon presents a solo recital that marks his festival debut at Lincoln Center’s Mostly Mozart, highlighting repertoire inspired by the kind of dance suite popular in the Baroque with movements including a chaconne, allemande, courante, fuga, and others. What distinguishes the concert-length suite Barnatan assembled is that each movement is by a different composer, and the composers themselves span periods from the Baroque to the 21st century. Also featured on the program is the New York premiere of Variations For Blanca by Thomas Adès, who himself has a penchant for musical dialogue with past eras: his deconstruction of a Dowland song serves as the title track on Barnatan’s album Darknesse Visible, which earned the pianist a coveted spot on the “Best of 2012” list in the New York Times. The concert can be streamed live here on lincolncenter.org beginning at 10pm ET.

Five days after his Mostly Mozart debut, Barnatan performs an almost entirely different solo recital at the Aspen Music Festival. This summer’s program includes Ravel’s notoriously difficult Gaspard de la nuit, also recorded on Darknesse Visible, as well as the U.S. premiere of Grawemeyer Award-winning composer Sebastian Currier’s Glow. Currier’s piece was another Barnatan commission, and the pianist gave the world premiere in London’s Wigmore Hall a year ago. 

Later in the month, Inon returns to the Mostly Mozart Festival to join Garrick Ohlsson August 24-27 for Mozart’s Sonata in D for Two Pianos, K. 448 in David Geffen Hall, part of a program that also includes performances by the Mostly Mozart Festival Orchestra and Mark Morris Dance Group.

 

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